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John looks at a submission for the upcoming Teens Curate Teens exhibition

In late March, Teens Curate Teens met with the chief curator of No Longer Empty, Manon Slome. She inquired about the reasons why the teens chose to join this program. Savannah responded that the catalyst for her interest in curating came from her experience of going to the museums with her friends — hearing her friends wonder about who made up these exhibitions and what they were thinking intrigued her. Savannah ultimately joined programs at the Whitney Museum and the Museum Teen Summit and then heard about this program. Mark, one of the artists in the group, saw this opportunity as a chance to better explore the world of the artist. As for me, the art scene feels like landing on the moon and taking my first steps as I’ve always been interested in art but never knew where to start. [click to continue….]

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gbhmulti2Wes Anderson has become one of the most notable directors of late.  His artistic style that he puts on his movies is very unique and distinguishes himself from many other directors. Moonrise Kingdom quickly became one of my favorite movies. The weird story and comedy quickly caught my attention and made me enjoy the movie. Anderson’s latest work, The Grand Budapest Hotel, is now also one of my favorites. It captures the same aspects of Moonrise Kingdom, and applies them to a whole different story. [click to continue….]

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Years have said that Shakespeare’s writing speaks for itself; living on for centuries in words that portray romance, agony, and historic settings, never thought to be portrayed through a different medium. Well, the talented Awoye Tempo, director and architect of Sonnets on Tap, mentored by the Lisa Peterson, manages to fuse the art of tap dance with the art of Shakespeare’s words. Both shocking and memorable, her usage of tap dance does Shakespeare justice; symbolism, stage setup, movement, comes together to portray the emotion expressed in Shakespeare’s words. The prior thought that Shakespeare’s writing can only be portrayed through his very words becomes a myth, as Cherry Lane Theatre puts on a production that both perplexes the viewer and interprets the eternal old-fashioned words of Shakespeare with the modern dance of tap. [click to continue….]

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IMG_0002A few weeks ago, the Teens Curate Teens team got together with our instructor Nate and continued our discussions on how we wanted to present artworks in the up-coming art exhibition in Sugar Hill, Harlem. We sat down, put our thinking caps on, and listed several topics and ideas we wanted to the exhibition to represent.

Among the ideas were family, hope, education, the community, etc. The main idea everyone agreed on was that the show needed to tell what Sugar Hill, a well known community for its rich history in African-American history, was all about.

To help us learn more about the community, our TraC instructor Nate and Jodie from No Longer Empty then suggested that the group walk a few blocks in Sugar Hill, and ask the locals what they think about it. Before we left, we talked about what we needed to learn and what questions we would ask. Mostly, we wanted to know what were the people’s most memorable moments about the area. [click to continue….]

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As a resident of New York City, I’m no stranger to street performers. It’s not an uncommon sight to see men and women on the streets and in subway stations using their artistic crafts to make money. Their creations provide the passerby with a moment to observe a more raw form of creativity than most people are used to. The visual pieces aren’t hung on the walls of museums, the music isn’t coming from one’s headphones, and the more physical pieces aren’t being carried out on stages while the audience sits quietly in their seats. It’s a more fluid and interactive method of performing.

The Cost of Living is an award-winning film that utilizes physical theater to tell the story of two street performers. Dave, a disabled dancer without legs,  and his friend Eddie share an apartment and a profession. The movie uses the physicality of the characters as well as sections of choreography to explore a multitude of subjects such as disability, spectatorship, and identity. By almost exclusively watching the movements of the actors instead of focusing on their dialogue, the audience was asked to reconsider what it means to be human. Words were spoken but they were essentially of no consequence. Instead, what was important was the aggression, panic, and tenderness with which the characters communicated. Those emotions were then used to tell the resonating theme; all of humanity is connected and isolated by our ability to communicate with each other using our bodies.  [click to continue….]

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Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church in Manhattan presents an array of programs including DraftWork, showing dances that are in the process of being created. The first piece, Invisible Landscape, during a March 2014 session, was choreographed and performed by Aretha Aoki. [click to continue….]

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The Improvisational Repertory Theatre Ensemble is now into their third season of improvised shows that are sure not to disappoint. The Scary is a comedic tribute to the writer Stephen King. Along with props, costumes, and audience participation the IRTE team is able to put on an entertaining performance. The show has a unique and radical feel because of the “make it up as you go” philosophy. The actors are well invested in this character-driven show. The amount of fun they were having is obvious to the audience. [click to continue….]

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Settling into the plush seats in the beautiful Cherry Lane theatre is a relaxing activity. Seeing Ode to Joy, the play by Craig Lucas, is anything but. It’s an emotional rollercoaster. The main character, Adele (Kathyn Erbe), struggles with addiction, love, and her art career, painfully messing up at every turn. You dig your nails into the armrests as you watch the horrors of alcohol and drug addiction ruin her life. It’s incredibly frustrating. The story is told in flashbacks, going back and forth between her two relationships. The first with Mala (Roxanna Hope), the snob, who, when she’s not selling pharmaceuticals, is whipping her hair in every direction known to mankind. Although an unlikely pair, Adele and Mala form an unusual relationship which mostly consists of loud arguments that solve no problems, but are entertaining. The second relationship is with Bill (Arliss Howard); and even though they are both much older, their actions are not that different from those of teenagers. They have the best repertoire, constantly exchanging views on Kierkegaard, Jesus, and irony. But the at first quick witted responses turn into sitcom jokes, as they drown themselves in vodka. [click to continue….]

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