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Devan Manning

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All of you romance lovers out there I come to you today with advice: please take your 7-13 dollars and put it into a savings account or give it to charity or use it to set a bon-fire… look whatever you do just don’t spend it on The Lucky One, a movie that fails to live up to the hype on practically every scene.

The movie starts off with U.S. Marine Logan (Zac Efron) a marine who returns to Colorado from Iraq, with the one thing he credits with keeping him alive: a photograph he found of a woman he does not know. [click to continue….]

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Say this for Leonardo DiCaprio: He doesn’t scare off easily from acting challenges. At 37, he’s already played billionaire Howard Hughes (The Aviator) junkie Jim Carroll (The Basketball Diaries) great imposter Frank Abagnale Jr. (Catch Me If You Can) and Shakespeare’s Romeo (Romeo and Juliet). In J. Edgar, directed by Clint Eastwood, DiCaprio ages from his twenties to his seventies to play America’s most feared and loathed top cop, J.Edgar Hoover. And despite being buried in layers of (often too obvious) prosthetic latex, DiCaprio is a roaring wonder in the role.

The movie shows you different events of J.Edgar Hoover’s life and the investigations he led, which is educational for anybody who is interested his legacy. In all honesty, I didn’t know who Hoover was until I saw this movie.  Now I know few things: he was the one of the most powerful men in the world, he would manipulate other powerful leaders, he had mommy issues, and he was a man with many secrets. But all of that in this movie is nothing that special.  [click to continue….]

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Mirror Mirror is nothing special for anybody that loved the original Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937 film). Mirror Mirror reflects the basic elements of the original, but the changes don’t add anything new and interesting to the classic story. We already know what happens in Snow White– and adding some more comedy and more plot does not cut it. Is this a good movie? [click to continue….]

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Let’s be honest: we could use some new fairy tales. After all, passive princesses hardly reflect the modern mores of 21st century audiences. So Snow White and the Huntsman,” a solemn but mostly savvy rewrite, is a welcome upgrade and a passable movie too.

As is so often the case, this story’s most fascinating character is its villain. After waging war on a wooded kingdom, the gorgeous and darkly magical Ravenna (Charlize Theron) marries its ruler only to murder him. His child, Snow White (Kristen Stewart), is locked away until the fateful day when Ravenna’s mirror proclaims Snow the fairest in the land. Her fate seems to be sealed when the youth-obsessed Ravenna learns that she can earn immortality by (literally) stealing her stepdaughter’s heart. [click to continue….]

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“Every single song I heard gave me goosebumps.” Photo Credit: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Memphis is one of the most heartwarming down to earth musicals I saw in 2012. The story in Memphis is loosely based on disc jockey Dewey Phillips, one of the first white DJs to play black music in the 1950s. Dewey Phillips wanted to bring black music to white listeners in the segregated South, where in the 1950’s segregation in the United States has meant the physical separation and provision of separate facilities (especially during the Jim Crow era), but it can also refer to other manifestations of racial discrimination such as separation of roles within an institution, such as the United States Armed Forces up to the 1950s when black units were typically separated from white units but were led by white officers. Black music was never popular to white listeners or on the radio; Dewey Phillips wanted to change that.

Memphis has songs that made me so desperate to dance to, because it gives the rock and roll feeling to bring everybody in the stage. [click to continue….]

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Going to the Film Society of Lincoln Center was a good idea to start off our first film in Film TRaC. I wasn’t sure what we were going to watch but I was very interested in going anyway. When I heard about the film we were watching I was actually very excited in seeing it with my beloved Film TRaC friends. The movie we saw was Shakespeare High, a drama-documentary directed by Alex Rotaru.

Shakespeare High is a feature-length documentary about a determined group of teens whose immersion in the Drama Teachers Association of Southern California’s high school drama program compels them to overcome their difficulties and create better lives for themselves. Theater has become their inspiration – a reason to strive and overcome adversity. The film features their stories of how the arts enriches their lives amidst personal troubles, including poverty, violence, gangs, drugs, absentee parents, as well as the troubles and hardships of adolescence. Through Shakespeare, these students are able to find community; they discover passion, drive, and confidence to pursue their dreams and dictate the course of their lives.

Among the many famous alumni of this almost 100 year-old program are Kevin Spacey, Val Kilmer, Mare Winningham and Richard Dreyfuss, and are all featured in the movie.

The movie starts off strong [click to continue….]

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The adaptation of the HUNGER GAMES was released in theaters last Friday to the delight and dismay of the die-hard fans. Which side are you on?? Photo Credit: SCREENRANT.com

The Hunger Games based off the worldwide best-selling book series by Suzanne Collins arrived in theaters last Friday.  The movie hit the key points for any die-hard fans of the first book, but sadly and simply put, it was way too rushed.

The movie it starts off in the post-apocalyptic world, Panem. It shows you who Katniss is and her family and what they do every day in their life. Katniss is a hunter that is very good with a bow and arrow and Peeta is a baker that lives with his family is very good with his strength and camouflaging in the environment. In the book they tell you more about who they are, in the film they just get to the point to keep on running with the story. There is one flashback where they show Peeta giving bread to the pigs and finds Katniss in the rain all alone and tosses the whole wheat bread to her in the ground.  This is where they met for the first time in the film, but in the book they knew each other because they go to the same school. This is very inaccurate and confusing [click to continue….]

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Hugo

by Devan Manning on February 21, 2012

in Film,Teen Reviews,TRaC

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Asa Butterfield in "Hugo." Photo Credit: Jaap Buitendijk.

Hugo is one of the best films I’ve seen in 2011;  it has memorable characters,  a well told story and amazing 3D that make it a masterpiece. Hugo was based on the novel by Brian Selznick, The Invention of Hugo Cabret.

The movie takes place in the Paris Railway Train Station in 1931. In the beginning of the movie Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) is a young orphan taking care of the clocks in the train station that needs to be fixed. [click to continue….]

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