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Summer TRaC

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The third week of Summer TRaC was dedicated to the arts uptown with trips to Lincoln Center and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Check out reviews from Week 3: Going Up right here!

Don’t forget to keep up with everything TRaC, free, and summer with the hashtag #mapfreecity.

  • Check out our thoughts on Red Hot + FELA LIVE! at the Out of Doors Festival at Lincoln Center with reviews from Jackie, Olivia, and Yoshi.
  • Read about the latest exhibitions at the Bronx Museum with reviews from Dawn, Drew, Chelsea, Julean, Sonia, and Talia.

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There was a low monotonous whistle. As it progressed, there came the sound of guitars, and then as the song kept steady, no one moved. Suddenly, there’s a beat! And it almost seems as if its coursed through all of us. Without moving we stay stuck in our seats. And do you know what the audience is craving? Another saxophone riff. [click to continue….]

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The second week of Summer TRaC was dedicated to green living with trips to the Brooklyn Grange and the High Line. Check out reviews from Week 2: Emerald Jungle right here!

Also be sure to view photos from our green week on Flickr. And keep up with everything TRaC, free, and summer with the hashtag #mapfreecity.

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During the first week of Summer TRaC, participants headed downtown to the River to River Festival hosted by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC).

On Wednesday, July 10, TRaC checked out Fluid: Construct, an art installation at One Liberty Plaza, as well as Wally Cardona and Jennifer Lacey’s The Set Up at Pier 15. On Thursday, July 11, TRaC returned to the River to River Festival to catch a breathtaking performance of  This Great Country presented by the 600 HIGHWAYMEN.

The first week of TRaC also marked the launch of the summer’s Map Free City project. Summer TRaC participants will spend the next four weeks traveling all over the five boroughs, seeing FREE arts events, writing about them, and tracking it all on this map. [click to continue….]

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The audience looks on as dancers perform on the green in The Set Up.

They move in such a way that they no longer seem of this world. As part of 2013′s River to River Festival, the third installment of an eight-part series, The Set Up: Jean-Christophe Pare, choreographed by Wally Cardona and Jennifer Lacey, takes the public viewers on an artistic journey of a lifetime. Its’ unique aesthetic and presentation leaves people suspended in both bewilderment and captivity.  [click to continue….]

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While stuck in Virginia for the duration of a week, I slowly began to go insane. Instead of ending up within the confines of a mental institution, I visited the Mariners Museum. This museum caters to the life of Virginians and stores over 60,000 photos and documents that showcase this state’s progression from the early 1700s and on. [click to continue….]

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This August, a group of fourteen Teen Reviewers and Critics (TRaC) and their intrepid instructor, Brian McCormick, ventured out into New York City to take in some culture. After exploring two exhibitions/installations on Tuesday, and speaking to representatives from each, everyone wrote reviews.  They then reconvened the following Thursday for a discussion and workshop. Their work is published here in the first of a two-part series featuring writing from Summer TRaC!

“Surface Tension: The Future of Water”  a traveling exhibition developed by Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin was on display at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center from May 31- August 11. Check out the excerpts and full reviews below….

“With an underwater microphone and an amplifier, artist Katie Paterson gave people world-wide a chance to call nature which, as it turns out, is much grungier-sounding than its distant American cousins: the running faucet and the water fountain.” - Olga Lebedeva

Read Olga’s full review.

“If poverty and politics are at the heart of the water crisis, then this exhibition about the future of water did not have much information about why they are or how to solve those problems.”  - Harry Katz

Read Harry’s full review.

“Science-inspired artwork and design is what Surface Tension is all about.  This amazing show is an excellent way to educate and reveal fantastic artwork to the public; this is only a small preview of what can be seen there.” - Isabel Ng

Read Isabel’s full review.

“Coverage.  Download.  Breaking.  These are ordinary words that you will find all over the news.  But when they are individually and massively spelled out in water, each getting a few seconds to captivate the audience before they vanish as a waterfall and are then replaced by another word, they are something else entirely:  art.” - Dawn Rafal

Read Dawn’s full review.

“The exhibit was very hands-on…visitors were able to experience what it would be like if every time you needed water you had to pump it from the ground.” - Analise Rode

Read Analise’s full review.

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Coverage.  Download.  Breaking.  These are ordinary words that you will find all over the news.  But when they are individually and massively spelled out in water, each getting a few seconds to captivate the audience before they vanish as a waterfall and are then replaced by another word, they are something else entirely:  art.  “Surface Tension: The Future of Water,” a thought-provoking art exhibit at the Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in Chelsea, ties together visual art and technology while educating people on worldly matters related to water.  Unfortunately, Eyebeam is no longer housing this exhibition (which originally came from the Science Gallery in Dublin), but you can check online to see where it is traveling to next.

Upon walking into Eyebeam, the aforementioned Bit.Fall (see photo above) was the first thing to catch my eye.  The words appearing in the waterfall were the most searched words on the New York Times website at the moment.  The way the words could be streamed and then created almost instantaneously was similar to the technology of an inkjet printer. [click to continue….]

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